Picture of Schrodinger II
Overhead view of illuminated Schrodinger II.

Schrodinger II

Schrödinger is an exercise in frustrated observation. The closer you inspect the piece, the lower the lights will fall and your reflection will obscure the contents. In sum, there is nothing to see here.

Schrödinger speaks to expectations and observation. The common process of analyzing a piece is through closer inspection. And yet, with Schrödinger, the closer the viewer approaches the piece, the less detailed it becomes. It is designed to counter user paradigms and force the viewer to reassess their interaction with art. Moreover, it casts in contrast the medium of most work to be seen, in order to convey its message. There is nothing to see but, hopefully, plenty to think about.

Schrödinger II is the extended exhibition incarnation of the Schrodinger project. In place of an actual cat, there is a diorama referencing Schrödinger’s original experiment: a cat, a Geiger counter, a hammer, a vial. Along with lights that are triggered by the viewer’s proximity, there is now an MP3 board which plays meowing sounds if no one has come close to the piece in a while. If someone does come close, the piece will purr. You may not be able to see it, but it appreciates the attention.

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  1. Pingback: Artist Elizabeth Fuller on the Intersection of Art and Technology | Artist Marketing Resources

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© Elizabeth Fuller 2013